County in California, United States

County in California, United StatesCalaveras County, CaliforniaCalaveras County view

FlagSealInteractive map of Calaveras CountyCountryUnited StatesStateCaliforniaRegionsSierra Nevada, Gold CountryIncorporatedFebruary 18, 1850[1]Named forSpanish word meaning “skulls”County seatSan AndreasLargest communityRancho Calaveras • TypeCouncil–CAO • BodyBoard of Supervisors[2] • ChairGary Tofanelli • Vice ChairAmanda Folendorf • Board of Supervisors[2]

Gary TofanelliJack GaramendiMerita CallawayAmanda FolendorfBenjamin Stopper
 • County Administrative Oficer[3]Crista Voh Latta • Total1,037 sq mi (2,690 km2) • Land1,020 sq mi (2,600 km2) • Water17 sq mi (40 km2)Highest elevation8,174 ft (2,491 m) • Total45,292 • Density44/sq mi (17/km2)Time zoneUTC−8 (Pacific Time Zone) • Summer (DST)UTC−7 (Pacific Daylight Time)Area code209FIPS code06-009GNIS feature ID1675885Websitecalaverasgov.us
Calaveras County (), officially the County of Calaveras, is a county in both the Gold Country and High Sierra regions of the U.S. state of California. As of the 2010 census, the population was 45,292.[5] The county seat is San Andreas.[6] Angels Camp is the county’s only incorporated city. Calaveras is Spanish for “skulls”; the county was reportedly named for the remains of Native Americans discovered by the Spanish explorer Captain Gabriel Moraga.
Calaveras Big Trees State Park, a preserve of giant sequoia trees, is in the county several miles east of the town of Arnold on State Highway 4. Credit for the discovery of giant sequoias there is given to Augustus T. Dowd, a trapper who made the discovery in 1852 while tracking a bear. When the bark from the “Discovery Tree” was removed and taken on tour around the world, the trees became a worldwide sensation and one of the county’s first tourist attractions. The uncommon gold telluride mineral calaverite was discovered in the county in 1861 and is named for it.
Mark Twain set his story “The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County” in the county. The county hosts an annual fair and Jumping Frog Jubilee, featuring a frog-jumping contest, to celebrate the association with Twain’s story. Each year’s winner is commemorated with a brass plaque mounted in the sidewalk of downtown Historic Angels Camp and this feature is known as the Frog Hop of Fame.
In 2015, Calaveras County had the highest rate of suicide deaths in the United States, with 49.1 per 100,000 people.[7]

Etymology[edit]
The Spanish word calaveras means “skulls.” The county takes its name from the Calaveras River; it was said to have been named by Spanish explorer Gabriel Moraga, during his 1806–1808 expeditions, when he found many skulls of Native Americans along the banks of the stream. He believed they had either died of famine or been killed in tribal conflicts over hunting and fishing grounds. A more likely cause was a European epidemic disease, acquired from interacting with other tribes near the Missions on the coast. The Stanislaus River, which forms the southern boundary, is named for Estanislao, a Lakisamni Yokuts who escaped from Mission San Jose in the late 1830s. He is reported to have raised a small group of men with crude weapons, hiding in the foothills when the Mexicans attacked. The natives were quickly decimated by Mexican gunfire.
In 1836, John Marsh, Jose Noriega, and a party of men went exploring in Northern California. They made camp along a river bed in the evening, and upon waking discovered that they had camped amid a great quantity of skulls and bones. They also gave the river the name Calaveras.[8][9][10]
Twain spent 88 days in the county in 1865, during which he heard the story that became “The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County” at the Angel Hotel. This story kicked off his career and put Calaveras County on the map.[11]

History[edit]
Calaveras County was one of the original counties of the state of California, created in 1850 at the time of admission to the Union. Parts of the county’s territory were reassigned to Amador County in 1854 and to Alpine County in 1864.[1]
The county’s geography includes beautiful landmarks, rolling hills, and giant valleys. It is also known for its friendly communities, and businesses such as agriculture management and construction engineering. It has numerous caverns, such as Mercer Caverns, California Cavern and Moaning Cavern that are national destinations for tourists from across the country. Other attractions include a thriving wine making industry, including the largest of the Calaveras wineries: Ironstone Vineyards, mountain sports recreation and the performing arts.
Gold prospecting in Calaveras County began in late 1848 with a camp founded by Henry Angel. Angel may have first arrived in California as a soldier, serving under Colonel Frémont during the Mexican War. After the war’s end, he found himself in Monterey where he heard of the fabulous finds in the gold fields. He joined the Carson-Robinson party of prospectors and set out for the mines. The company parted ways upon reaching what later became known as Angels Creek. Henry Angel tried placer mining but soon opened a trading post. By the end of the year, over one hundred tents were scattered about the creek and the settlement was referred to as Angels Trading Post, later shortened to Angels Camp.
Placer mining soon gave out around the camp, but an extensive gold-bearing quartz vein of the area’s Mother Lode was located by the Winter brothers during the mid-1850s, and this brought in the foundations of a permanent town. This vein followed Main Street from Angels Creek up to the southern edge of Altaville. Five major mines worked the rich vein: the Stickle, the Utica, the Lightner, the Angels, and the Sultana. These mines reached their peaks during the 1880s and 1890s, when over 200 stamp mills crushed quartz ore brought in by hand cars on track from the mines. By the time hard rock mining was done, the five mines had producing a total of over $20 million in gold.[12]
The telluride mineral calaverite was first recognized and obtained in 1861 from the Stanislaus Mine, Carson Hill, Angels Camp, in Calaveras Co., California.[13] It was named for the County of origin by chemist and mineralogist Frederick Augustus Genth who differentiated it from the known gold telluride mineral sylvanite, and formally reported it as a new gold mineral in 1868.[14][15]

Geography[edit]
California Caverns – Calaveras County
According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,037 square miles (2,690 km2), of which 1,020 square miles (2,600 km2) is land and 17 square miles (44 km2) (1.6%) is water.[16] A California Department of Forestry report lists the county’s area in acres as 663,000, although the exact figure would be 663,477.949 acres (2,685.00000 km2). There are a number of caverns located in Calaveras County.

Adjacent counties[edit]

National protected area[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population

Census
Pop.


185016,884—186016,299−3.5%18708,895−45.4%18809,0942.2%18908,882−2.3%190011,20026.1%19109,171−18.1%19206,183−32.6%19306,008−2.8%19408,22136.8%19509,90220.4%196010,2893.9%197013,58532.0%198020,71052.4%199031,99854.5%200040,55426.7%201045,57812.4%202045,292−0.6%U.S. Decennial Census[17]1790–1960[18] 1900–1990[19]1990–2000[20] 2010[21] 2020[22]

2020 census[edit]

Note: the US Census treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.

2011[edit]

Population, race, and income

Total population[23]

45,794

  White[23]

41,672

91.0%

  Black or African American[23]

496

1.1%

  American Indian or Alaska Native[23]

571

1.2%

  Asian[23]

601

1.3%

  Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander[23]

16

0.0%

  of other race[23]

1,114

2.4%

  Two or more races[23]

1,324

2.9%

 Hispanic or Latino (of any race)[24]

4,688

10.2%

Per capita income[25]

$28,667

Median household income[26]

$55,256

Median family income[27]

$67,253

Places by population, race, and income[edit]

Places by population and income

Place

Type[28]

Population[29]

Per capita income[25]

Median household income[26]

Median family income[27]

Angels
City
3,820
$28,279
$48,614
$65,625

Arnold
CDP
3,172
$32,814
$53,036
$54,296

Avery
CDP
415
$15,683
$23,162
$28,750

Copperopolis
CDP
4,177
$27,834
$62,798
$71,715

Dorrington
CDP
466
$32,069
$39,677
$39,435

Forest Meadows
CDP
1,546
$37,177
$81,950
$84,212

Mokelumne Hill
CDP
717
$28,816
$68,622
$77,000

Mountain Ranch
CDP
1,541
$30,141
$46,444
$61,224

Murphys
CDP
1,965
$30,462
$43,885
$52,330

Rail Road Flat
CDP
410
$24,343
$35,882
$36,618

Rancho Calaveras
CDP
5,997
$27,578
$72,623
$77,528

San Andreas
CDP
2,941
$20,835
$37,657
$65,096

Vallecito
CDP
841
$27,786
$78,209
$79,459

Valley Springs
CDP
4,196
$28,404
$67,009
$74,500

Wallace
CDP
131
$38,162
$46,691
$46,691

West Point
CDP
654
$18,043
$37,997
$38,516

2010 Census[edit]
The 2010 United States Census reported that Calaveras County had a population of 45,578. The racial makeup of Calaveras County was 40,522 (88.9%) White, 383 (0.8%) African American, 689 (1.5%) Native American, 571 (1.3%) Asian, 79 (0.2%) Pacific Islander, 1,534 (3.4%) from other races, and 1,800 (3.9%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4,703 persons (10.3%).[30]

Population reported at 2010 United States Census

The County
TotalPopulation

two ormore races

Calaveras County

45,578
40,522
383
689
571
79
1,534
1,800
4,703

TotalPopulation

two ormore races

Angels Camp

3,836
3,329
12
48
49
5
270
123
498

TotalPopulation

two ormore races

Arnold

3,843
3,590
20
28
46
3
60
96
259

Avery

646
604
5
7
3
1
2
24
38

Copperopolis

3,671
3,318
31
43
36
12
83
148
454

Dorrington

609
576
0
2
11
1
1
18
33

Forest Meadows

1,249
1,198
0
4
14
0
7
26
60

Mokelumne Hill

646
571
3
12
4
0
26
30
66

Mountain Ranch

1,628
1,472
15
33
18
2
15
73
123

Murphys

2,213
2,045
9
17
7
10
82
43
223

Rail Road Flat

475
411
0
15
4
2
9
34
41

Rancho Calaveras

5,325
4,645
48
102
87
13
195
235
670

San Andreas

2,783
2,453
23
48
28
1
83
147
255

Vallecito

442
398
0
6
11
1
5
21
33

Valley Springs

3,553
3,047
35
39
70
6
179
177
454

Wallace

403
347
3
4
10
2
22
15
32

West Point

674
563
0
43
2
7
29
30
67

TotalPopulation

two ormore races

All others not CDPs (combined)

13,582
11,955
179
238
171
13
466
560
1,397

2000[edit]
As of the census[31] of 2000, there were 40,554 people, 16,469 households, and 11,742 families residing in the county. The population density was 40 people per square mile (15/km2). There were 22,946 housing units at an average density of 22 per square mile (9/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 91.2% White, 0.8% Black or African American, 1.7% Native American, 0.9% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 2.1% from other races, and 3.3% from two or more races. 6.8% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 15.7% were of German, 13.0% English, 10.7% Irish, 7.4% Italian and 7.0% American ancestry according to Census 2000. 94.5% spoke English and 4.0% Spanish as their first language.
There were 16,469 households, out of which 26.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.9% were married couples living together, 8.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.7% were non-families. 23.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 2.85.
In the county, the population was spread out, with 22.8% under the age of 18, 5.5% from 18 to 24, 22.4% from 25 to 44, 31.1% from 45 to 64, and 18.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45 years. For every 100 females there were 98.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.7 males.
The median income for a household in the county was $41,022, and the median income for a family was $47,379. Males had a median income of $41,827 versus $28,108 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,420. About 8.7% of families and 11.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.6% of those under age 18 and 6.2% of those age 65 or over.

Economy[edit]
The major Calaveras County employers include:
250–499 employees:

Calaveras County Government
Forestry & Fire Protection
Mark Twain St. Joseph’s Hospital
100–249 employees:

Bret Harte High School
Ironstone Vineyards
Calaveras High School
Mark Twain Convalescent Hospital
Mountain Machinery[32]
Government[edit]
Calaveras County is governed by a five-member Board of Supervisors.
Supervisors are elected by district at the Consolidated Primary Election and serve for four years.
Current Board of Supervisors:
Gary Tofanelli (District 1); Jack Garamendi (District 2); Merita Callaway (District 3); Dennis Mills (District 4) and Benjamin Stopper (District 5).
In January 2020 Merita Callaway was elected Chair of the Board and Ben Stopper was elected Vice Chair. Albert Alt is the County Administrative Officer and Sarah DeKay is the interim County Counsel. Both are appointed by and serve at the pleasure of the Board of Supervisors.

Elections and politics[edit]
Voter registration statistics[edit]

Population and registered voters

Total population[23]

45,794

  Registered voters[33][note 3]

28,763

62.8%

    Democratic[33]

8,841

30.7%

    Republican[33]

12,221

42.5%

    Democratic–Republican spread[33]

-3,380

-11.8%

    Independent[33]

1,310

4.6%

    Green[33]

261

0.9%

    Libertarian[33]

348

1.2%

    Peace and Freedom[33]

94

0.3%

    Americans Elect[33]

3

0.0%

    Other[33]

211

0.7%

    No party preference[33]

5,474

19.0%

Cities by population and voter registration[edit]

Cities by population and voter registration

City

Population[23]

Registered voters[33][note 3]

Democratic[33]

Republican[33]

D–R spread[33]

Other[33]

No party preference[33]

Angels
3,820
61.9%
31.5%
42.9%
-11.4%
11.2%
18.1%

Overview[edit]

Calaveras County is in California’s 4th congressional district, represented by Republican Tom McClintock.[34]
In the State Senate, Calaveras County is in the 8th Senate District, represented by Democrat Angelique Ashby.[35] In the State Assembly, it is in the 5th Assembly District, represented by Republican Frank Bigelow.[36]
Past presidential elections in Calaveras County have displayed preferences for Republican candidates; the last Democrat to win a majority in the county was Lyndon Johnson in 1964, although Democrat Bill Clinton lost the county by only 17 votes in 1992. By contrast, recent elections have seen a sharp upswing in Democratic voter registrations.[37]

United States presidential election results for Calaveras County, California

Year

Republican

Democratic

Third party

No. 
%
No. 
%
No. 
%

2020

16,518

60.57%

10,046

36.84%

708

2.60%

2016

13,511

57.42%

7,944

33.76%

2,076

8.82%

2012

12,365

56.56%

8,670

39.66%

827

3.78%

2008

12,835

54.80%

9,813

41.90%

773

3.30%

2004

13,601

60.87%

8,286

37.09%

456

2.04%

2000

10,599

56.15%

7,093

37.58%

1,184

6.27%

1996

8,279

48.12%

6,646

38.63%

2,281

13.26%

1992

6,006

35.35%

5,989

35.25%

4,996

29.40%

1988

7,640

56.28%

5,674

41.80%

260

1.92%

1984

7,632

64.26%

4,081

34.36%

164

1.38%

1980

6,054

58.92%

3,076

29.94%

1,145

11.14%

1976

3,695

49.08%

3,607

47.91%

226

3.00%

1972

4,119

60.76%

2,268

33.46%

392

5.78%

1968

3,042

52.16%

2,134

36.59%

656

11.25%

1964

2,244

41.58%

3,145

58.27%

8

0.15%

1960

2,820

52.60%

2,509

46.80%

32

0.60%

1956

2,843

57.91%

2,049

41.74%

17

0.35%

1952

3,112

61.65%

1,890

37.44%

46

0.91%

1948

1,888

46.77%

1,995

49.42%

154

3.81%

1944

1,455

43.19%

1,893

56.19%

21

0.62%

1940

1,649

40.39%

2,405

58.90%

29

0.71%

1936

960

27.16%

2,520

71.31%

54

1.53%

1932

754

29.01%

1,744

67.10%

101

3.89%

1928

1,262

53.79%

1,066

45.44%

18

0.77%

1924

872

39.44%

333

15.06%

1,006

45.50%

1920

1,480

63.96%

641

27.70%

193

8.34%

1916

1,175

40.91%

1,524

53.06%

173

6.02%

1912

5

0.16%

1,869

60.51%

1,215

39.33%

1908

1,323

55.54%

833

34.97%

226

9.49%

1904

1,571

58.75%

844

31.56%

259

9.69%

1900

1,600

54.59%

1,288

43.94%

43

1.47%

1896

1,541

49.92%

1,518

49.17%

28

0.91%

1892

1,355

49.69%

1,276

46.79%

96

3.52%

The following table includes the number of incidents reported and the rate per 1,000 persons for each type of offense.

Population and crime rates

Population[23]

45,794

Violent crime[38]

84
1.83

  Homicide[38]

1
0.02

  Forcible rape[38]

16
0.35

  Robbery[38]

14
0.31

  Aggravated assault[38]

53
1.16

Property crime[38]

523
11.42

  Burglary[38]

284
6.20

  Larceny-theft[38][note 4]

405
8.84

  Motor vehicle theft[38]

99
2.16

Arson[38]

8
0.17

Cities by population and crime rates[edit]

Cities by population and crime rates

City

Population[39]

Violent crimes[39]

Violent crime rateper 1,000 persons

Property crimes[39]

Property crime rateper 1,000 persons

City of Angels
3,826
14
3.66
86
22.48

Transportation[edit]
Major highways[edit]

Public transportation[edit]
Calaveras Transit provides service in Angels Camp, San Andreas, and other communities in the county. Intercounty connections are available to Columbia (Tuolumne County), Jackson (Amador County), and Lodi (San Joaquin County).

Airports[edit]
Calaveras County Airport is a general aviation airport located just southeast of San Andreas.

Communities[edit]
Cities[edit]
Angels Camp is the only incorporated city located in Calaveras County.

Census-designated places[edit]

Other communities[edit]

Former settlements[edit]

Special districts[edit]

Altaville Cemetery District
Altaville-Melones Fire District
Angels Camp Fire District
Bret Harte Union High School District
Calaveras County Air Pollution Control District
Calaveras Unified School District
Central Calaveras Fire and Rescue Protection District
Copperopolis Fire Protection District
Ebbetts Pass Fire Protection District
Foothill Fire District
Jenny Lind Fire District
Mark Twain Health Care District
Mark Twain Union Elementary School District
Mokelumne Hill Fire District
Murphys Fire District
San Andreas Fire District
Vallecito Union Elementary School District
Valley Springs Public Utilities District
West Point Fire District.[40]

Population ranking[edit]
The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2010 census of Calaveras County.[41]
† county seat

See also[edit]

^ Other = Some other race + Two or more races

^ Native American = Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander + American Indian or Alaska Native

^ a b Percentage of registered voters with respect to total population. Percentages of party members with respect to registered voters follow.

^ Only larceny-theft cases involving property over $400 in value are reported as property crimes.

References[edit]

^ a b “Chronology”. California State Association of Counties. Retrieved February 6, 2015.

^ a b “Supervisors”.

^ “Solano County – County Administrator”.

^ Corral Ridge

^ “Calaveras County, California”. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 30, 2022.

^ “Find a County”. National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.

^ “Underlying Cause of Death, 1999–2015 Results”. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved January 11, 2017.

^ Lyman, George D. John Marsh, Pioneer: The Life Story of a Trail-blazer on Six Frontiers, pp. 207–8, The Chautauqua Press, Chautauqua, New York, 1931.

^ Winkley, John W., Dr. John Marsh: Wilderness Scout, pp. 54–5, The Parthenon Press, Nashville, Tennessee, 1962.

^ Thompson, Thomas Hinkley, and West, Albert Augustus. History of San Joaquin County, California, p. 13, 1879.

^ Parvini, Sarah (February 28, 2018). “A rural county legalized marijuana farms. It took their tax money – then voted to ban them”. Los Angeles Times. Retrieved October 3, 2019.

^ Koeppel, Elliot H. (December 1996). “Angels Camp”. The California Gold Country: Highway 49 Revisited. Malakoff & Co. ISBN 0-938121-12-X.

^ “Calaverite: Calaverite mineral information and data”. www.mindat.org. Retrieved March 25, 2018.

^ American Journal of Science. (2). xlv, p. 314.

^ http://www.libraries.psu.edu/content/dam/psul/up/emsl/documents/circulars/circular27.pdf Archived March 4, 2012, at the Wayback Machine Biographical paper on F. A. Genth

^ “2010 Census Gazetteer Files”. United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved September 24, 2015.

^ “Census of Population and Housing from 1790-2000”. US Census Bureau. Retrieved January 24, 2022.

^ “Historical Census Browser”. University of Virginia Library. Retrieved September 24, 2015.

^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). “Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990”. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 24, 2015.

^ “Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000” (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved September 24, 2015.

^ a b “P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE – 2010: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) – Calaveras County, California”. United States Census Bureau.

^ a b “P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE – 2020: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) – Calaveras County, California”. United States Census Bureau.

^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B02001. U.S. Census website . Retrieved October 26, 2013.

^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B03003. U.S. Census website . Retrieved October 26, 2013.

^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19301. U.S. Census website . Retrieved October 21, 2013.

^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19013. U.S. Census website . Retrieved October 21, 2013.

^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19113. U.S. Census website . Retrieved October 21, 2013.

^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates. U.S. Census website . Retrieved October 21, 2013.

^ U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B01003. U.S. Census website . Retrieved October 21, 2013.

^ “2010 Census P.L. 94-171 Summary File Data”. United States Census Bureau.

^ “U.S. Census website”. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.

^ “Calaveras County Largest Employers”. usaINFO. January 2008. Archived from the original on May 13, 2006. Retrieved March 10, 2008.

^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q California Secretary of State. February 10, 2013 – Report of Registration Archived November 3, 2013, at the Wayback Machine. Retrieved October 31, 2013.

^ “California’s 4th Congressional District – Representatives & District Map”. Civic Impulse, LLC. Retrieved March 1, 2013.

^ “Senators”. State of California. Retrieved March 20, 2013.

^ “Members Assembly”. State of California. Retrieved March 20, 2013.

^ “Election Archives”. elections.co.calaveras.ca.us. Retrieved October 21, 2017.

^ a b c d e f g h i j Office of the Attorney General, Department of Justice, State of California. Table 11: Crimes – 2009 Archived December 2, 2013, at the Wayback Machine. Retrieved November 14, 2013.

^ a b c United States Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation. Crime in the United States, 2012, Table 8 (California). Retrieved November 14, 2013.

^ “Largest Calaveras County Employers”. infoUSA. January 2008. Archived from the original on May 13, 2006. Retrieved March 10, 2008.

^ 2010 Census

Further reading[edit]
A Memorial and Biographical History of the Counties of Merced, Stanislaus, Calaveras, Tuolumne and Mariposa, California. Chicago: Lewis Publishing Co., 1892.
“Tuolumne-Calaveras Unit: 2005 Pre-Fire Management Plan September 28, 2005 Edition,” California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, Sep 28, 2005, pp. 16, 17
United States Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics.
External links[edit]

Places adjacent to Calaveras County, California

Coordinates: 38°13′N 120°33′W / 38.21°N 120.55°W / 38.21; -120.55

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